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The wildlife path

The wildlife of the Alps and the animals’ ideal habitats

The walk starts at the Fontanino Hostel, not far from the Ramoni al Còler car-park. It leads up the Maleda Valley, passing the pastures and hay barns at Còler, entering the conifer woodland. The path comes out on the Maleda Valley forest track; it follows this track for a short while, up to the turn where the old mule path starts that crosses the pastures of the Lower Malga Stablàz, and leads to the alpine pastures of the upper malga. From here, half way up the slope, the path follows the slope at the forest limit, passes the viewing point at Forborìda, crosses the alpine grassland at Pravedèla, and finally comes out at the beautiful Campisolo Waterfall and the hut bearing the same name. You return walking down CAI-SAT path no. 128, which will take you to the Dòs de le Crós, down the Saènt Valley and back to the beginning of the walk.
Length: 10,740 m
Drop: 780 m
Time: 5 h

 
The wildlife path

During this walk, the visitor may get to know the wildlife of the mountains, and of the Alps in particular, and find out all about the animals’ ideal habitats. Equipped with a good pair of binoculars, proper clothing, a good dose of patience and by keeping silent, you may observe hoofed animals (red and roe deer, chamois) in their natural environment. You will also see marmots and, with a bit of luck, the little vole, black grouse, rock partridge and an eagle in flight.
You will not always be lucky in your observations, however, especially if you are trying to watch the animals in the middle of the day, and during the hottest hours, when their activity is much reduced. It is useful, therefore, to learn to discover and identify the signs of their presence, such as footprints, droppings and other characteristic marks they leave on the ground.
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