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Walk to Pian Palù lake and the charcoal kilns

The Pian Palù Lake, the larch trees and the charcoal-kilns

The starting point of this walk is Fontanino di Celentino (1,680m), in the Monte Valley, where you may use the car-park. From here, you take CAI-SAT path no. 110, which for the most part follows the shores of Lake Pian Palù, with its characteristic emerald-coloured surface. The lake is, in fact, a man-made reservoir, built in the 1950s for hydroelectric purposes. The walk will take you to Malga Pian Palù and, continuing upwards along the path, to Malga Paludèi, the highest point of this circular route, from where you can enjoy panoramic views of the valley and the surrounding mountains. You then walk down the ancient mule path on the left-hand side of the lake, which is sign-posted CAI-SAT path no. 124. At a certain point, you will come to a crossroads and a deviation for visiting the charcoal-kilns. After that, continue along path no. 124 that will take you towards Malga Giumella and back to the Fontanino car-park, which is the end of the route.
Length: 9,950 m
Drop: 440 m
Time: 3.45 h

 
Walk to Pian Palù lake and the charcoal kilns

This is one of four “Dendrochronological Paths of Stelvio National Park” in the Rabbi and Peio valleys. Dendrochronology deals with the dating of annual tree rings in order to determine their ages.
The path around Lake Pian Palù will take you to five-hundred-year-old larch trees below Malga Paludèi and to some charcoal-kilns between the malghe Paludèi and Giumella. In the 15th and 16th centuries, vast woodland areas in the Peio Valley were felled in order to provide the necessary charcoal to fuel the smelting furnaces of the local iron industry. The dendrochronological analysis of charcoal pieces excavated from Pian Palù kilns provided evidence for another woodland clear-felling to make charcoal in 1858/59.
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