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Walk to the sawmills

The Venetian sawmills "dei Braghje" and "dei Bègoi"

The walk starts at the Braghje sawmill at Rabbi Fonti; it follows the track along the stream Rabbiés towards the Thermal Baths of Rabbi, and then continues along the metalled road to the Plan car-park. From there, after about 700 metres, a country-lane will take the visitor to the Bègoi sawmill, which, like the other sawmill, has been restored by the Park’s work force. Their working mechanisms were also overhauled, and now both sawmills are fully functioning. The walk continues to Ragaiolo bridge and from there to the waterfall bearing the same name. You then follow the road crossing the wooded slope about half way up the mountain, above the wide plain of the area called Plan. The path is crossed by the stream Rabbiés and leads past some of the typical hay barns of the Rabbi Valley. As the path follows almost level ground, and is equipped with a toilet for the disabled, it is also suitable for disabled people. It is, in fact, one of the walks belonging to the project “A Park for everyone”.
Length: 3,580 m
Drop: 80 m
Time: 1.30 h

 
Walk to the sawmills

The theme of this walk is the discovery of the relationship between man and woodland, as indicated by the Venetian sawmills and the concept of silviculture. In the past, sawmills with a water-wheel were very common. Water energy was utilized to cut tree trunks into floorboards and beams. Today, very few of these ancient sawmills are still functioning. In the 13th century, this type of sawmill was introduced to the Trentino from the nearby Republic of Venice, where they were already common; hence the name “Venetian Sawmill”. In the Rabbi Valley, the water-driven sawmills are, however, of more recent origin (the 18th century). With these sawmills, timber sawing became easier, quicker, more precise and much less exhausting. The muscular strength of two or three men was replaced by water energy, and a single workman - the sawyer - sufficed to carry out the various phases of the work. In the Rabbi Valley, this particular industry flourished until the 1960s.
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