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The common european viper

Vipera berus

The common European viper or adder is very similar to the asp viper. It does not exceed 55cm length and a maximum weight of 100g. The pattern on the back, a dark zigzag band accompanied by a series of round spots along the flanks, is the same in both sexes. The colouring varies, however. Males have a black pattern on grey ground, whereas females have a dark brown pattern on lighter brown ground. The pupils are of a vertically elliptical shape.
The common European viper has two long fangs that are connected with the venom gland. Being hollow on the inside, in the position of rest, the teeth are bent backwards, against the palate. At the moment of biting, they rapidly move forward, forming a right angle with the jaw. This viper avoids human beings, and becomes aggressive only when it feels threatened, for example, when it is surprised by ... a hand in the grass, feeling for mushrooms or berries.
The bite leaves two small holes caused by the venom teeth, but sometimes also the signs of the other teeth are visible, which are less deep and obvious. The venom is a very complex substance, consisting of a multitude of enzymes and toxins that may produce both local and systemic symptoms. For an adult person in good health, the bite is not mortal, but one should, in any case, seek immediate medical assistance. The danger increases when children, old or already weak people have been bitten.
The common european viper
 
The common european viper